Stick a fork in 802.11n, it’s almost done!

Last week, the IEEE 802.11 working group met in San Francisco. Activity on the long-awaited 802.11n standard has been slowly moving through the process for several meetings now. On Friday, we took what is likely to be the final step as the 802.11 working group. We held our final approval vote, requesting that higher layers of the IEEE 802 group approve 11n for publication.

The vote felt somewhat anti-climactic. In a lightly discussed and debated motion to send the 802.11n draft onward, 53 members (including your correspondent) voted in favor, 1 voted against , and 6 abstained.

Following the working group’s approval, the IEEE 802 executive committee voted unanimously (14 for, none against or abstaining) to send 802.11n to “RevCom,” the IEEE Standards Board Review Committee. The IEEE Standards Board next meets on September 11, 2009.

In an interesting twist, September 11 is a date relevant to the history of 802.11n. Bruce Kraemer, the long-time chair of Task Group N and the current chair of the 802.11 working group, noted that the first meeting of the “High Throughput Study Group,” the precursor to TGn, was September 11, 2002.

If approved, the 802.11n effort will have taken exactly seven years, at least by one measure. We are a long way from the first time 802.11n passed the 75% threshold.

The 802.11 working group is already working on the next step. Two task groups (TGac and TGad) are researching and debating methods to create gigabit-capable physical layers.

11 Responses to “Stick a fork in 802.11n, it’s almost done!”

  1. […] Matthew Gast, chief strategist in the office of the Chief Technology Officer, has announced on his blog that the final vote to ratify 802.11n could take place as early as September 11, 2009. It has taken […]

  2. 2 general questions (because the ieee site has not updated 802.11n info in months).

    What was the final draft approval number (11 or 12)?

    Is dual band (2.4 & 5.8 operation) a requirement for the final specification?

  3. […] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for final review and publication, according to a blog entry by Matthew Gast, chief strategist at Trapeze Networks and a member of the task group. There was […]

  4. […] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for final review and publication, according to a blog entry by Matthew Gast, chief strategist at Trapeze Networks and a member of the task group. There was […]

  5. […] Ratifizierung von WLAN-Standard 11n steht bevor David Meyer, Florian Kalenda| 23.07.09, 18:35 Uhr Empfehlen Drucken Trackback Bookmark Kommentar verfassen Die zuständige Working Group hat die Spezifikation verabschiedet. Jetzt muss nur noch das Standards Board sie absegnen. Dies soll am 11. September passieren – exakt sieben Jahre nach Beginn der Arbeiten.Die 802.11 Working Group des Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) hat die Highspeed-WLAN-Spezifikation 802.11n verabschiedet. Das berichtet ihr Mitglied Matthew Gast von Trapeze Networks in seinem Blog. […]

  6. […] Electronics Engineers (IEEE) para su revisión y publicación final, según una entrada de blog de Matthew Gast, estratega jefe de Trapeze Networks y miembro del grupo de […]

  7. […] Matthew Gast apprendiamo (membro della commissione incaricata di approvare le specifiche Wireless) che dopo […]

  8. […] Instituto de Ingenieros Eléctricos y Electrónicos para su revisión final y publicación, según Matthew Gast, jefe de Trapeze Networks. Sólo hubo un voto en […]

  9. […] The 802.11n spec celebrates its seventh anniversary without ratification: The gears at the IEEE grind but slowly, and 802.11n is still not actually a ratified and published standard even though its been built (in “draft” form) into tens of millions of devices, and has a certification standard (Draft N, natch) at the Wi-Fi Alliance. (The alliance is separate from the IEEE, developing standards for testing interoperability of commercially produced devices using the IEEE standards as the basis.) […]

  10. […] week, the IEEE 802.11 working group met in San Francisco,” blogged IEEE member Matthew Gast. “On Friday, we took what is likely to be the final step as the […]

  11. […] in July, I wrote that the IEEE Standards Board would consider 802.11n for approval on September 11. That meeting has occurred, the votes have been taken, and the standard has been […]

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