802.11n draft 2.0 passes the 75% hurdle

Two months ago in London, the IEEE 802.11 working group sent out a new 802.11n draft out for a vote.

The ballot closed on Friday. I’m sitting in the opening plenary for this week’s IEEE 802.11 meeting in Orlando, and the results of the ballot have just been reported. The short of it is that draft 2.0 did receive a 75% supermajority. Due to the interest in the draft, Stuart Kerry, the 802.11 working group chair, announced that the 2.0 draft would be made available for sale by the IEEE.

For the curious, here are the facts:

  • 325 voters were eligible to participate in the ballot. 306 (94.2%) did. (There is a floor on the return ratio which must be met before a ballot result is followed.)
  • 231 voters approved of the draft, which at 83.4% handily surpassed the 75% threshold required to move forward. From this point on, the 802.11n draft will go through what’s called a “recirculation” ballot. Subsequent drafts will go back to the same set of voters from January as long the approval rate stays above 75%.
  • There were 46 votes (16.6%) not in favor of approving, and 28 abstensions (9.2%). Four votes were invalid and not counted.
  • There is likely to be some minor change to the draft going forward. It received 3,163 comments (including duplicates). The task group leadership did some basic comment processing, and reported that there are 1,441 unique editorial comments and 1,635 unique technical comments.

It’s not quite correct to say that the draft has “passed,” since it’s not yet moving on to the next stage of the IEEE process (called a “sponsor ballot”). However, it’s clear from the results that the draft is technically solid. While there may be some minor changes to the existing text before ratification, it seems almost certain that the major features have taken shape, especially since draft 2 is going to be used as the basis for Wi-Fi certification efforts.

8 Responses to “802.11n draft 2.0 passes the 75% hurdle”

  1. […] Draft 2.0 of the 802.11n spec has been approved by the 802.11 Working Group, moving the increasingly popular wireless networking technology a step closer to its final form. 83.4 percent of the votes were for approval, easily surpassing the 75 percent supermajority required—a marked contrast from the early days of 802.11n, when infighting over competing technologies stalled development. […]

  2. […] It’s been a long, hard road for all of us — consumers, manufacturers, developers, and a little club called the 802.11n Working Group — but the next-gen, MIMO-powered WiFi standard has finally reached an important milestone in its tortured journey from a wee pre-N to a full-fledged spec (hopefully!), with 83.4% of eligible voters approving the latest Draft 2.0 revision. As we all remember from the overwhelming initial rejection of draft 1.0, a 75% supermajority is required for moving on to the next stage, so the fact that there was this much support coupled with relatively few comments (3,000-some versus the 12,000+ for that famous draft 1.0 flameout) means that we may actually be on track for a planned April 2009 publication of the final IEEE spec. The best part is that since Draft 2.0 is guaranteed to be fully compatible with the finalized 802.11n, your current gear with the D 2.0 badge of honor will definitely play nice with future components. So we’re in the home stretch now, folks — all that’s left is some nitpicking over technicalities and language — and it looks like the naysayers will have been proven wrong after all; although when WiMax comes to town and makes WLANs irrelevant, there’s a good chance that this whole ordeal will be quickly forgotten. […]

  3. […] It’s been a long, hard road for all of us — consumers, manufacturers, developers, and a little club called the 802.11n Working Group — but the next-gen, MIMO-powered WiFi standard has finally reached an important milestone in its tortured journey from a wee pre-N to a full-fledged spec (hopefully!), with 83.4% of eligible voters approving the latest Draft 2.0 revision. As we all remember from the overwhelming initial rejection of draft 1.0, a 75% supermajority is required for moving on to the next stage, so the fact that there was this much support coupled with relatively few comments (3,000-some versus the 12,000+ for that famous draft 1.0 flameout) means that we may actually be on track for a planned April 2009 publication of the final IEEE spec. The best part is that since Draft 2.0 is guaranteed to be fully compatible with the finalized 802.11n, your current gear with the D 2.0 badge of honor will definitely play nice with future components. So we’re in the home stretch now, folks — all that’s left is some nitpicking over technicalities and language — and it looks like the naysayers will have been proven wrong after all; although when WiMax comes to town and makes WLANs irrelevant, there’s a good chance that this whole ordeal will be quickly forgotten. […]

  4. […] It’s been a long, hard road for all of us — consumers, manufacturers, developers, and a little club called the 802.11n Working Group — but the next-gen, MIMO-powered WiFi standard has finally reached an important milestone in its tortured journey from a wee pre-N to a full-fledged spec (hopefully!), with 83.4% of eligible voters approving the latest Draft 2.0 revision. As we all remember from the overwhelming initial rejection of draft 1.0, a 75% supermajority is required for moving on to the next stage, so the fact that there was this much support coupled with relatively few comments (3,000-some versus the 12,000+ for that famous draft 1.0 flameout) means that we may actually be on track for a planned April 2009 publication of the final IEEE spec. The best part is that since Draft 2.0 is guaranteed to be fully compatible with the finalized 802.11n, your current gear with the D 2.0 badge of honor will definitely play nice with future components. So we’re in the home stretch now, folks — all that’s left is some nitpicking over technicalities and language — and it looks like the naysayers will have been proven wrong after all; although when WiMax comes to town and makes WLANs irrelevant, there’s a good chance that this whole ordeal will be quickly forgotten. […]

  5. […] It’s been a long, hard road for all of us — consumers, manufacturers, developers, and a little club called the 802.11n Working Group — but the next-gen, MIMO-powered WiFi standard has finally reached an important milestone in its tortured journey from a wee pre-N to a full-fledged spec (hopefully!), with 83.4% of eligible voters approving the latest Draft 2.0 revision. As we all remember from the overwhelming initial rejection of Draft 1.0, a 75% supermajority is required for moving on to the next stage, so the fact that there was this much support coupled with relatively few comments (3,000-some versus the 12,000+ for that famous Draft 1.0 flameout) means that we may actually be on track for a planned April 2009 publication of the final IEEE spec. The best part is that since Draft 2.0 is guaranteed to be fully compatible with the finalized 802.11n, your current gear with the D 2.0 badge of honor will definitely play nice with future components. So we’re in the home stretch now, folks — all that’s left is some nitpicking over technicalities and language — and it looks like the naysayers will have been proven wrong after all; although when WiMax comes to town and makes WLANs irrelevant, there’s a good chance that this whole ordeal will be quickly forgotten anyway. [Via Ars Technica] […]

  6. […] It’s been a long, hard road for all of us — consumers, manufacturers, developers, and a little club called the 802.11n Working Group — but the next-gen, MIMO-powered WiFi standard has finally reached an important milestone in its tortured journey from a wee pre-N to a full-fledged spec (hopefully!), with 83.4% of eligible voters approving the latest Draft 2.0 revision. As we all remember from the overwhelming initial rejection of Draft 1.0, a 75% supermajority is required for moving on to the next stage, so the fact that there was this much support coupled with relatively few comments (3,000-some versus the 12,000+ for that famous Draft 1.0 flameout) means that we may actually be on track for a planned April 2009 publication of the final IEEE spec. The best part is that since Draft 2.0 is guaranteed to be fully compatible with the finalized 802.11n, your current gear with the D 2.0 badge of honor will definitely play nice with future components. So we’re in the home stretch now, folks — all that’s left is some nitpicking over technicalities and language — and it looks like the naysayers will have been proven wrong after all; although when WiMax comes to town and makes WLANs irrelevant, there’s a good chance that this whole ordeal will be quickly forgotten anyway. […]

  7. […] If approved, the 802.11n effort will have taken exactly seven years, at least by one measure. We are a long way from the first time 802.11n passed the 75% threshold. […]

Leave a Reply